Your pregnancy, your midwife, your choice

Information

14 Dec

Personal Maternity Care Budget to be piloted in Liverpool

The 12th December 2016 saw the launch of the first pilot of the implementation of Personal Maternity Care Budgets by the Cheshire and Merseyside Pioneer. This is the first step in fulfilling one of the recommendations for the transformation of maternity services in the Better Births Report 2016. Better Births recommends that all women should have personalised care, centred on the woman, her baby and her family, based around their needs and their decisions, where they have genuine choice. Better Births also set out a vision that women should be able to choose the provider of their antenatal, birth and postnatal care and be in control of exercising those choices through their own NHS Personal Maternity Care Budget.

Initially the pilot is being rolled out by Liverpool Women’s Hospital with a handful of selected GP surgeries but the press launch has stated that other providers in the Pioneer will roll out PMCBs early in 2017. One to One Midwives, as a commissioned provider in Cheshire and Merseyside will be offered as a choice to women to use their PMCB but for One to One Midwives this will be ‘business as usual”.

One to One are already a choice option for women and their families – but what do One to One offer?

Quite simply One to One provides a service that is centred on the needs and choices of women and their families. We do this through our model of Continuity of Carer – every woman who books with One to One will be contacted by her named midwife and see her midwife for the vast majority of her antenatal visits.

One to One midwives see their women for 88% of their antenatal visits. 
One to One midwives attend 75% of the births of women that they know
One to One midwives see their women and babies for 80% of their postnatal visits.

This is what continuity of carer means to us.

What else can you expect from the One to One service?

As all care is based on your needs and choices, the number of visits is unlimited, both antenatally and postnatally and as well as face-to-face visits, you will also have access to your midwife 24 hours a day, 7 days a week by phone, text or email to discuss any concerns or advice that you may need.

The majority of visits take place in your own home, with the option to have your appointments in the evenings or at the weekend, which ensures that your partners can also participate in your care. One to One have three Pregnancy Advice Centres open in Cheshire and Merseyside and run local clinics and scan appointments out in the local community to ensure you have an additional choice of where to receive care, which will be as close to your home as possible.

One to One offers numerous social networking opportunities in our local community hubs and we also provide hypnobirthing and parent education and courses as standard.

We employ MaMAs (Mother and Midwife Assistants) to offer additional support in the antenatal as well as the postnatal period. Our MaMAs can support you with becoming more confident parents as well as providing you with practical advice and support regarding infant feeding and baby care.

Our midwives are trained to recognise and deal with any complications that occur and if necessary we can refer you to an obstetrician within a local hospital of your choice to ensure that you receive safe and appropriate care when needed.

If everything goes well with your pregnancy and you choose a homebirth, your One to One midwife will ensure that you have access to a pool (if you choose a waterbirth) and access to our KG Hynobirthing course, which can be booked directly via our One to One website.

After the birth your One to One midwife, with the support of your MaMA, will visit you at home as often as you need until at least 6 weeks after your baby has been born.

One to One Midwives are delivering what the pioneer is aiming to deliver across the rest of Cheshire and Merseyside in the future. If you want to know more about the One to One service or how you can access our care you can contact us via the following options:

o Send an enquiry via our website at: http://www.onetoonemidwives.org/enquiries 
o By telephone: 0330 3309 121
o Via your GP

To find out if One to One is available in your area, contact us on Facebook: https://www.facebook.com/OnetoOneMidwives or using any of the above contact methods.

14 Jun

One to One Midwives: June is breastfeeding awareness month

June is breastfeeding awareness month and we are celebrating the great benefits of breast milk for you and your baby.

As well as being convenient and perfectly designed for your baby, breast milk also protects your baby from infections and diseases. Breastfeeding can build a strong emotional bond between you and your baby and also provides health benefits for you too.

Here at One to One we have dedicated midwife and mothers assistants (MaMAs) on hand to offer advice on breastfeeding before your baby arrives and for six weeks after as part of our unique post-natal care, as well as your dedicated midwife who is with you throughout your pregnancy.

Two of our MaMAs, Julie and Sarah, have given us their top tips for breastfeeding:

Research and speak to a MaMa before you have your baby – ask your midwife
Understand how small your baby’s tummy is: http://www.ameda.com/breastfeeding/the-first-12-months
Get off to a good start, eat well and keep hydrated
Take a vitamin supplement that contains vitamin D
Understand when growth spurts stages are and why your baby is doing them: http://kellymom.com/bf/normal/growth-spurts/
Good positioning and attachment
Sleep when baby sleeps
Know about feeding cues and being baby lead
Effective sucking/supply and demand: http://youtu.be/Zln0LTkejIs
Ask for support: One to One Mama support/breastfeeding groups.

Breastfeeding reduces the risk of:

• Infections, with fewer visits to hospital as a result 
• Diarrhoea and vomiting, with fewer visits to hospital as a result 
• Sudden infant death syndrome (SIDS) 
• Childhood leukaemia 
• Type 2 diabetes 
• Obesity 
• Cardiovascular disease in adulthood

For mums breastfeeding and making breast milk also has health benefits. Breastfeeding lowers your risk of:

• Breast cancer 
• Ovarian cancer 
• Osteoporosis (weak bones) 
• Cardiovascular disease 
• Obesity

One to One breastfeeding facts and figures:

Initiation rate for all women: One to One: 79% England: 73.9% 
Initiation rate for homebirth: One to One: 91% 
Still breastfeeding at 14 days: One to One (All Women): 69% England: NA 
Still breastfeeding at 14 days home birth: One to One: 81% 
Still breastfeeding on discharge (6weeks): One to One: 57% England: 47.2%
Still breastfeeding for home birth: One to One: 67%

* Figures taken from One to One’s Quality Report 2014/2015
** Breastfeeding information taken from www.NHS.uk

The Liverpool One to One Team will be joining the Breastfeeding Celebration Parade on Monday, June 20, to celebrate Breastfeeding Feeding Awareness Week. The Parade will assemble at St Georges Hall at 11:30AM and will officially start at 12:00PM. It will end at Chavasse Park close to 12:30pm. There will then be a picnic in Chavasse Park (weather permitting) and if it rains we would love to see you at John Lewis Café for cake and coffee! Midwife Lorna and Mama Michelle will be there.

To find details of Wirral breastfeeding events please visit: http://www.wirralct.nhs.uk/news-campaigns/news/latest-news/celebrate-breastfeeding-awareness-month-with-us

11 Aug

The Newborn and Infant Physical Examination (NIPE)

Shortly after birth, your baby will be offered a number of tests and examinations to screen for any health conditions that may be present. The Newborn and Infant Physical Examination (NIPE) is one of the tests offered and as the name suggests, consists of a physical examination of your baby. It will be offered to you within 72 hours of birth and again between 6-8 weeks of age.

The main purpose of the NIPE is to identify babies born with heart, hip and eye problems so that any necessary treatment can be started quickly. For baby boys, it also screens for problems with the testes. In addition, the health professional carrying out the examination will be looking for anything unusual about your baby’s general appearance and wellbeing that may indicate an underlying problem.

Before the start of the examination, you will be asked a few questions around your pregnancy, your own health and any medical conditions that may be present in any of your baby’s immediate family members. You will also be asked about your baby’s behaviour and feeding pattern since birth and should be given the opportunity to discuss any concerns you may have about your baby’s health and behaviour. Your baby will need to be undressed for part of the examination and although your baby may cry, the examination is not painful for your baby. You will be told the results of the examination immediately. If a problem has been found, a referral to a specialist may be necessary for further investigations and to confirm a diagnosis.

Although it is recommended that every newborn baby has a NIPE examination, you have the right to decline it, or part of it. If you have any worries or concerns about the examination then please speak to your midwife or other health professional. It is also important to know that not every condition will be identified during the NIPE, as some conditions don’t develop or show symptoms immediately. If you notice anything about your baby that you are worried about, you should therefore speak to your midwife, health visitor or a doctor without delay.

Post by Jo, One to One midwife

26 Jun

Campaign for a normal birth

As a case loading midwife I love being able to empower women and families to make informed decisions about their pregnancy, birth and care they receive during and after this time. One of the tools I like to use is the Royal College of Midwives (RCM) – Campaign for normal birth: Ten top tips for midwives.

Normal is specific to each individual and my aim as a caseloading midwife is to help women and their families have a positive experience during their pregnancy, labour and birth. The RCM’s Campaign for normal birth has information for both midwives and women and can be adapted to all care settings.

One of the ten top tips is “build her a nest” and this promotes the midwife/partner/woman creating a safe environment for the woman to birth in. Regardless of whether you are birthing at home, in a midwifery led unit or obstetric unit; certain aspects can be used to help support physiological labour in all settings.

Please find below the link to the RCM Campaign for normal birth website and a short poem I have created capturing “building a nest” in labour.

Your journey is starting and instincts kick in,
Peacefully find a dark place to relax in.
Warm and secure surrounded by love.
Allowing your hormones to blossom and bud.
Privacy and quiet you must be allowed,
In your nesting environment as calm as a cloud.
Feel the support that your body can do
Confidently ending your journey
Baby and you!!!!

http://www.rcmnormalbirth.org.uk/

Post by Sarah Jurd, One to One Midwife

18 Jun

Induction of labour

There are so many discrepancies in hospitals across the UK as to when is the best time to offer an Induction of Labour (IOL). It is important to understand that an IOL is just an offer of care and like every choice you make in pregnancy, you do not have to accept it.

Your One to One midwife will talk to you about the risks and benefits of this option towards the end of your pregnancy. Your midwife can also discuss what plan of care can be put in place to reassure you if you chose to decline an IOL. We call this 'conservative management'.

An IOL is performed in hospital and can be done in many ways. The main types of induction are:

1. A pessary (a small vaginal tablet) 
2. A gel (inserted vaginally) 
3. Artificial Rupture of Membranes (breaking the waters) 
4. Intravenous Syntocinon (hormone drip given through a cannula).

The main aim of types 1 and 2 IOL is to soften and "ripen" the cervix so that your body will begin to labour and dilate the cervix without further assistance. Sometimes if this is unsuccessful in producing spontaneous tightening’s/surges you may be offered type 3 IOL, if this is unsuccessful in producing spontaneous tightening’s/surges you may be offered type 4 IOL.

IOL is a long process sometimes spanning over a 1-2 days depending on how many different stages/types of IOL is required. It is important in this time to mobilise as much as possible, eat and hydrate so that you can prime your body for labour and birth.

What are your experiences or thoughts on IOL? What are your experiences or thoughts on conservative management?

Post by Lorna, One to One midwife


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